# CLVI…History Lessons, Musical and Otherwise…

On this date, February 20, in the year 1933, the United States government proposed the Twenty-First Amendment to the Constitution, which, at the time, was the answer that they sought against the negative effects that Prohibition had on the country at that time.  When the country first entered the age of Prohibition (however good the idea seemed), it was wracked with more ill side effects than the act of drinking…we don’t need to be reminded of people like Al Capone and his role in the “glory” of the speakeasy.  Consequently, the 21st Amendment ended up being a godsend, for as soon as it was ratified, our country’s “health” was put back on track for the next seven decades…although, with the current “prohibition” issues, we could change this country in a heartbeat, if we dealt with “that” in a similar manner…

The other history lesson for all is an event that, as someone with an extensive behind-the-scenes background in music would know, further changed the way musicians perform live…for it is the 2003 concert at “The Station” in West Warwick, RI that marred this industry.  For those that don’t remember, it was during a concert by the now-infamous Great White, where a pyrotechnics display (which, common sense now dictates, should not have even been considered) erupted inside the venue and killed 100 people (including then-guitarist Ty Longley) and injured a couple hundred more.  As I stated earlier, given the size and outlay of the club, it is with that tragic hindsight that makes performers today really pay attention to their craft even further, with safety now paramount to their success.

I have also come here, obviously, to give you a few names for the birthday roll; fashion designer Gloria Vanderbilt turns a young 90 today (1924), “To Sir With Love” star (among other films) Sidney Poitier was born in 1927, Hall of Fame race car driver Bobby Unser (1934), jazz great Nancy Wilson and auto racer/entrepreneur Roger Penske were born in 1937, former Boston Bruin/New York Ranger great Phil Esposito was born in 1942, multi-talented pixie Sandy Duncan (she played Peter Pan on Broadway, hence the pun) and the frontman for The J. Geils Band, Mr. J. Geils himself were born in 1946 and actor Anthony Head, who was Rupert Giles in the TV smash “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” turns 60 today (1954).

1963 gave way to NBA superstar/”mouth”piece Charles Barkley, “3rd Rock From the Sun” co-star French Stewart was born in 1964, supermodel Cindy Crawford came to us in 1966 and actor Andrew Shue, who many may remember from “Melrose Place” (boy, I really do show my age sometimes), was born in 1967, which was the same year that gave us southpaw pariah (and forever missed) Kurt Cobain…and I don’t really have anything bad to say about him or his influence on the musical world.

Having taken up just a little too much of your time (not that I’m apologizing…you people love “Harry Potter” and “50 Shades of Grey” so my blog is nothing in terms of “mind” space)…

/,,,/ ROCK ON DUDEZ \,,,\

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